Jan 28, 2017

Sunday Salon: Winter is Finally Here

Welcome to the Sunday Salon where bloggers share their reading each week. Visit The Sunday Post hosted by The Caffeinated Bookreviewer. Also visit It's Monday, What Are You Reading? hosted by Book Date.

The rain has stopped and the snow has started; flurries have left a thin layer of snow, but it seems real winter has arrived.

A novel with magic and fantasy by Laurent Gaude, Hell's Gate, in translation, arrived for review from public relations for Gallic Books. A Neapolitan taxi driver tries to bring his son back from the dead by searching for the entrance to the underground. This theme reminds me of the Italian poet Dante as well as Asian beliefs.
Great Books of China: From Ancient Times to the Present by Frances Wood, published December 13, 2017,  gives an account of the books, poetry, and important literature of China that describe the history and culture.
The title of this cozy, Twelve Angry Librarians, caught my eye. I can't imagine twelve angry librarians, at least not in the same space. The book is the eighth in the Cat in the Stacks series.

What's on your reading desk this week?  

Jan 27, 2017

Book Beginning: The Sunrise by Victoria Hislop

The Sunrise by Victoria Hislop, July 7, 2015 by Harper Paperbacks.
"...a saga of survival set during the 1974 coup d'etat in Cyprus that tells the intersecting stories of three families whose lives are decimated when ethnic tensions erupt into conflict." 

Book beginning:
Famagusta 15 August, 1972

Famagusta was golden. The beach the bodies of sunbathers and the lives of those who lived there were gilded by warmth and good fortune.

Fine, pale sand and a turquoise sea had together created the most perfect bay in the Mediterranean and pleasure-seekers came from all around the world to soak up its warmth and to enjoy the sensual pleasure of the calm waters that gently lapped around them. Here was a glimpse of paradise.

Page 56:
The (water polo) teams were mostly made up of Greek Cypriots, but some of the strongest players were Turkish Cypriot, and he often tried to persuade his youngest brother, Ali, to come down to the beach for a game.  

Victoria Hislop read English at Oxford, and worked in publishing, PR and as a journalist before becoming a novelist. She is married with two children.

Memes: The Friday 56. Grab a book, turn to page 56 or 56% of your eReader. Find any sentence that grabs you. Post it, and add your URL post in Linky at Freda's Voice. Also visit Book Beginning at Rose City Reader.

Jan 24, 2017

First Chapter: The Oxford Inheritance by Ann A. McDonald

The Oxford Inheritance: a Novel by Ann A. McDonald, November 15, 2016.
Genre: suspense, mystery
First chapter:
Oxford in the summertime was a city under siege. They came from across the oceans, from Norway and Brazil, India and Japan: civilizations old and new alike, descending on the dreaming spires and neat, lush quads as a single invading army, sounding their battle cry in the chatters of foreign tongues, faces painted with warlike stripes of sunscreen zinc. Uniting to traipse the well-worn trail from the peaceful floral walkways of the Botanic Garden to the vast, soaring dining hall at Christ Church College, divisions of race and nationality blurred beneath the Union Jack baseball caps and souvenir sweatshirts....

Book description: "At prestigious Oxford University, an American student searches for the truth about her mother’s death in this eerie, suspenseful thriller that blends money, murder, and black magic."

MEME: Every Tuesday Bibliophile by the Sea hosts First Chapter First Paragraph, Tuesday Intros sharing the first paragraph or two, from a book you are reading or will be reading soon.
 

Jan 22, 2017

Sunday Salon: Rain in January

Welcome to the Sunday Salon where bloggers share their reading each week. Visit The Sunday Post hosted by The Caffeinated Bookreviewer. Also visit It's Monday, What Are You Reading? hosted by Book Date

It's been raining the past few days. Not that I'm complaining about the lack of snow.
 
 I'm reading Krazy: The Black and White World of George Herriman by Michael Tisserand, December 6, 2016, Harper in slow stages, reading carefully. 

An interesting biography of the creator of the Krazy Kat comic strip. I recommend it. 

I'm also half-way through Beasts and Children: Stories by Amy Parker, February 2, 2016, Mariner Books.
 
Excellent short stories of children with absent, neglectful, dysfunctional, or preoccupied parents, and the animals the children love or come in contact with.

Two new books arrived, one for a tour coming up.
Abby's Journey by Steena Holmes, February 14, 2017. A young woman's travels in search for answers.
Saving Abby by Steena Holmes is the book that precludes Abby's Journey. They can be read separately.

What are you reading this week?
 

Jan 20, 2017

Book Beginning: Beasts and Children by Amy Parker

Beasts and Children: Stories by Amy Parker, February 2, 2016, Mariner Books
Source: library
First story beginning: "The White Elephant"

Carline and I sat at the breakfast table dressed as the dancing ostriches from Fantasia. It was Halloween morning, 1967 - the last year of my family's unbroken life - and my older sister and I were having a fight with our mother. She had made these outfits for our schools' costume parade.

There are ten stories in the book.

Page 56 from the story, " Rainy Season."

Maizie gets away with familiarity because she's young and cute.

About the author: Amy Parker is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and was a Michener Fellow at the University of Texas, Austin. She spent her childhood overseas among the diplomatic corps and is ordained in the Soto Zen monastic lineage. She lives in Wichita, Kansas.

Memes: The Friday 56. Grab a book, turn to page 56 or 56% of your eReader. Find any sentence that grabs you. Post it, and add your URL post in Linky at Freda's Voice. Also visit Book Beginning at Rose City Reader.

Jan 18, 2017

Choosing a Cozy by its First Lines

I have several cozy mysteries and I must choose which to read first. How to do this? By the cover, the title, the author, the series? I often choose by reading the first line. The one that grabs me quickest gets the first read. Here are a few first lines of some cozies. Which would you choose? 
Blown Away: A Kite Shop Mystery #1 by Clover Tate
The first rule about flying kites is that when the wind lifts them skyward, you give them line, not reel them in.

War and Peach: A Georgia Peach Mystery #3
by Susan Furlong
"I do say this election business has folks as divided as the states during Mr. Lincoln's war," one of the Crawford sisters was saying.
 
Mission Impawsible: Paws and Claws Mystery #4
by Krista Davis
By six o'clock on Thursday afternoon, one Gustav Vogel had failed to check into his room at the Sugar Maple Inn.
 
No Cats Alowed: A Cat in the Stacks Mystery #7
by Miranda James
"He's out there again, Charlie." Melba Gilley made the announcement as she strode hurriedly into my office at the Athena College Library. "Do you think we should call the campus police?"


A Wee Homicide in the Hotel: ScotShop Mystery #3
by Fran Stewart
Nobody expected to die attending Hamelin's third annual four-day Highland Festival.
 
Bookman Dead Style: A Dangerous Type Mystery
 by Paige Shelton
"It's my good luck you're here. I saw your shop last year but didn't have time to stop in. You have the best selection of this kind of stuff I've ever seen...." 
 
Which opening lines appeal to you?  

 

Jan 17, 2017

Krazy: The Black and White World of George Herriman by Michael Tisserand: First Chapter


Krazy: The Black and White World of George Herriman by Michael Tisserand, December 6, 2016, Harper

First paragraph, first chapter:
The San Francisco Sunday Examiner and Chronicle landed on doorsteps on August 22, 1971, on what would have been George Herriman's ninety-first birthday. Inside the paper was a story by San Francisco State University professor, Arthur Asa Berger, detailing his attempt to write an entry on Herriman for the Dictionary of American Biography. In his research, Berger had obtained information from the New Orleans health department about a child of that name born in 1880. But, Berger decided, the child had to be a different George Herriman. The reason? The birth certificate was marked "col." for "colored." The cartoonist George Herriman, Berger believed, was white.

Krazy is the biography of the cartoonist George Herriman (1880-1944), creator of the successful comic strip, Krazy Kat. "Michael Tisserand brings this little-understood figure to vivid life, paying homage to a visionary artist who helped shape modern culture."

The book reveals that the cartoonist did not disclose his African-American ancestry in order to be able to continue his art and his work for a newspaper syndicate in the early 20th century.

A timely post to honor Martin Luther King Jr. Day, yesterday.

Meme: Every Tuesday First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros are hosted by Bibliophile By the Sea. 
 

A September to Remember by Carol Bumpus: Review and Giveaway

  Premier Virtual Author Book Tours  presents A September To Remember by Carole Bumpus Posted on  January 27, 2021 A September to Remember:...