Oct 27, 2012

Novels of Erotica




Reflected in You by Sylvia Day, Lace by Shirley Conran, and The Pleasures of Winter by Evie Hunter all showed up on my doorstep recently, courtesy of the mail. I gather that erotic romances are all the rage, especially in England, after Fifty Shades of Grey came out. Now here are some in the same genre, by other writers, sent to me courtesy of the publishers.

I haven 't read Fifty Shades of Grey and don't plan to read these either, though Lace has my attention not as erotica but as the republishing of a "scandalous bestseller that defined a generation."  (publisher's description).

Have you read any of these? If so, what do you suggest?

6 comments:

  1. All but Lace showed up at my door, too. I don't read erotica, so I was a little puzzled to find them. I think the biggest thing that bothers me about this genre is not the subject matter as the fact that to many people these books are considered literature. I feel like we're facing the demise of quality books, and it worries me.

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  2. I haven't read any of these, but I have read Fifty Shades.

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  3. I've not read any of them, though I hear the Sylvia Day book is good. I used to be a big fan of erotic romance, though the Fifty Shades craze has turned me off of it, unfortunately. Not a fan of the copycat book covers, either!

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  4. I haven't heard or seen these ones. I did read the Fifty trilogy and loved the 1st one.

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  5. The covers do remind me of Fifty Shades. I wonder whether they're a rip-off storywise, or perhaps they do add something new to "mainstream" erotica?

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  6. Based on sales I'm probably not the target consumer for these books, but if you wish to read this genre, try Anais Nin's Delta of Venus . The collection of short stories that makes up this anthology was written during the 1940s for a private client known simply as "Collector"'. This "Collector" commissioned Nin, along with other now well-known writers (including Henry Miller), to produce erotic fiction for his private consumption. Despite being told to leave poetic language aside and concentrate on graphic, sexually explicit scenarios, Nin was able to give these stories a literary flourish and a layer of images and ideas beyond the pornographic. In the introduction, she called herself "the madam of this snobbish literary house of prostitution".

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