Jun 23, 2018

Sunday Salon: Digital versus Paper

Reader, Come Home: The Fate of the Reading Brain in a Digital World

My most intriguing new book is this ARC from Harper Collins.
Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World by Maryanne Wolf addresses what parents and educators are probably concerned or curious about - the overtaking of the printed word by digital and online media, its unforeseen consequences on children learning to read, the positive and the possible negative.

It was easy to start reading this book, being an avid reader.
I resisted ebooks for a long time, but then found them easier at times, especially in low light situations at night, or lying in bed. Now, I'm mostly back to reading paper, at least for now.
Sweet Little Lies

Sweet Little Lies by Caz Freat is due to be published August 14, 2018.  It's a crime novel that seems to be a thriller and police procedural, with a detective constable delving into the past and crimes that may involve her father.
The Woman in the Window

I admit I went out and bought this book, The Woman in the Window, not wanting to be on the very long waiting list for a library copy. It was quite an intriguing read, especially with the agoraphobic main character who swears she witnessed a murder from the window of her house. No one believes her as she is considered unreliable and delusional, and even her doctor admits that her medications can bring on hallucinations and  loss of a sense of reality.

I was caught up in the plot although toward the end, I guessed the truth. For me, it was not a surprise ending, but this didn't take away from my overall enjoyment of the book.

Trial on Mount Koya (Shinobi Mystery #6)
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Trial on Mount Koya by Susan Spann is the 6th Shinobi mystery set in medieval Japan and featuring a master ninja Hiro Hattori who solves crimes with his unusual sidekick, the Jesuit priest Fr. Mateo.  I enjoyed the first five and am eager to read this one for my book review on July 11, part of a book tour. Each of the books can be read as a stand alone novel.

Library book I'm currently reading:
The Red-Haired Woman

The Red-Haired Woman by Orhan Pamuk was a lucky find at the library. I don't read enough books narrated by young men/teenagers and written by male authors. This is a literary novel about an adolescent falling in love and dealing, well or not so well, with an uncomfortable working situation, well-digging in the countryside under a demanding and obsessed well digger.  I've just now finished the book, a five star read definitely.

The writer is so good that his book made me begin to feel guilty too, as guilty as his young protagonist, although I had none of his experiences and did none of the things this young protagonist did.

What books are you reading this week?
The Sunday Post  hosted by The Caffeinated Bookreviewer,  It's Monday, What Are You Reading? by Book Date., and Mailbox Monday. Also, Stacking the Shelves by Tynga's Reviews.

20 comments:

Brian Joseph said...

This seems like an interesting bunch of books. Reader Come Home sounds particularly intriguing. Digitalization of books had had a huge impact impact upon our world. I personally love digital books for a lot of reasons but I know that not everyone shares my opinion.

Deb Nance at Readerbuzz said...

I'm not a big mystery/thriller reader, but I thought Woman in the Window was very good.

Enjoy your week!

https://readerbuzz.blogspot.com/2018/06/paris-in-july-great-american-read-and.html

Andreea P. said...

I want to read all of your books! The Red-Haired Woman sounds intriguing, Trial on Mount Koya also sounds good (I love anything Japan) and you made me curious about The Woman in the Window.

Laurel-Rain Snow said...

I loved The Woman in the Window...and Sweet Little Lies looks very tempting.

I resisted the Kindle for a while, but then in 2010, my daughter gave me my first one for Christmas. She said she had visions of my hardcover books toppling onto me...with crushing results. She was hilariously calling me a hoarder!

I didn't like my first Kindle as much as my current one, but by the time I upgraded, I had discovered the advantages. Reading hefty books is easier on my device. And all that stuff about the light...I can read at the movies while waiting for the show to begin.

Thanks for sharing, and here are MY WEEKLY UPDATES

Harvee said...

Laurel-Rain, most of my books are in the basement where they can't fall on me when I'm sleeping!

Harvee said...

All three are good, Andreea. You can't go wrong!

Harvee said...

I thought it was a good spin off of Rear Window with Jimmy Stewart, with its own plot twists.

Harvee said...

Digitalized books, or ebooks, are so much more manageable and accessible. But I still love my paper books and being able to flip back and forth with ease.

Northwoman said...

I love all books but prefer digital because I can take 1000s of books with me wherever I go. Anne - Books of My Heart

Harvee said...

If a book is really good, it doesn't matter to me whether it's digital or paper!

Suko said...

Happy Sunday, Harvee! I prefer paper books, although digital books are great for travel.

Harvee said...

I agree, Suko!

Mary @ StackingMyBookShelves! said...

I just got The Woman in the Window but haven't read it yet. I hope you enjoy your new books!

Mary my #Sunday Roundup #24!

Harvee said...

Hope you like the book! Enjoy!

bermudaonion said...

I prefer print to digital too and I'm not really sure why. I liked The Woman in the Window a lot but thought it got a little long at one point.

pussreboots said...

I read by way of print, audio, and ebook. I read differently for each medium and use each medium for different purposes. My weekly updates

Harvee said...

Was the ending a complete surprise!

Harvee said...

I'm trying out audio....

Nicci said...

I love ebooks. Love love love them. I find paperbooks clunky now but I do love looking at all the covers.

(Diane) Bibliophile By the Sea said...

I enjoyed The Woman in the Window. I like eBooks or trade paperbacks the best these days.

Happy 4th Harvee.

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